San Diego Electrical Professionals Society

SDEPS Encourages Homeowners to Pull the Plug on Vampire Electronics

Vampire electronics are a term used for electrical devices that eat up power even if they are not in use. They are commonly turned on at night, and suck up electricity even if no one is using them, hence the term.


The San Diego Electrical Professionals Society (SDEPS) is encouraging homeowners to be moreconscious about these phantom sources of energy expense in homes. The SDEPS says, when summed up, the annual savings for pulling the plug on this can be substantial.

The United States Department of Energy has published statistics on this, as it urged the public to pull the plug on this energy drains. Association of Edison Illuminating Companies https://aeic.org/

"According to the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, an appliance constantly taking in 1 watt of electrical current is equivalent to 9kWh per year, adding up to $1 in annual costs (basically $1/watt/annual). Considering how many appliances are used in an average household, costs can quickly add up to $100-200 a year."

Read more here.

Prevalence of vampire electronics

Green Living Online also published a web post on these Phantom Power Loads or Vampire electronics saying they are becoming more and more prevalent on households. Big List of Electrician Services https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_electricians

"Phantom loads are definitely growing. The average Canadian or American home already has 25 or even more products that use standby power - devices that are consuming electricity 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. It is estimated that standby power accounts for as much as 10 percent of the average household's annual electricity consumption." The rest of the article can be read here

Phantom power

Harvard University also published a reminder about phantom power and how to stop it from increasing a home's power consumption. One of the items they mentioned is to ensure to shut down computers instead of putting it on screen saver mode to cut down on costs. "Eliminate vampire power: unplug idle electronics. Devices like televisions, microwaves, scanners, and printers use standby power, even when off. Some chargers continue to pull small amounts of energy, even when plugged in (a good judge of this is if a charger feels warm to the touch). In the US, the total electricity consumed by idle electronics equals the annual output of 12 power plants (EPA). Use a power strip to reduce your plug load." More tips can be found on the original article published here

The SDEPS says power bars are a great way to avoid power loss through vampire electronics. AT least with a reliable power strip, all the homeowner needs to do is to turn off the stip, and it will be as if he has unplugged all the appliances that eat up power load even when turned off.